Chemical Engineering (BSc)

The purpose of the Department of Chemical Engineering is to educate Chemical Engineers through a rigorous undergraduate degree program and to train chemical engineers technical and leadership skills, integrity, and social responsibility in order to serve their fellow citizens.

Chemical engineers study, design and operate processes to convert raw materials to useful finished products, to provide food, drinking water, fossil-based and alternative energy, polymers, electronic materials, pharmaceuticals, minerals, fertilizers, and textiles. Chemical engineers must achieve this task economically, safely and with minimum impact on the environment in an ecologically sustainable manner.

The program is offered through a blended mode of delivery, enjoying both in-person classes and online education. Here is a brief review of the structure of the program:

  • Use management theories to set goals and improve proficiency
  • Chemical engineering involves basic science courses such as mathematics, calculus, physics, inorganic and organic chemistry, statistics, statics and dynamics, materials science, strength of materials, and biology.
  • Courses specific to chemical engineering include heat and mass transfer, fluid mechanics, energy and mass balance, unit operations involving the operation of distillation columns, absorption columns, liquid-liquid extraction, crystallization, evaporation, drying, design of chemical reactors ranging from batch to continuous stirred tank, fixed-bed and fluidized-bed reactors. Instrumentation and fundamental and applied process dynamics and control are also covered.
  • The principles of process design are covered in a course followed by a capstone design course that often includes the simulation of an entire chemical, biochemical or a petrochemical plant, safety and hazard and operability analysis, and economic and profitability analysis. In addition, there are a series of applied engineering courses such as wastewater treatment, petroleum refining and upgrading, polymer processing, mineral processing and pharmaceutical engineering that in most chemical engineering schools are considered as technical elective courses. Courses in engineering ethics, the role of engineers in society, and humanities are considered as non-technical electives. y

Students are awarded B.Sc. in Chemical Engineering by accomplishing 131 credits with leading skills in promoting the process and design of chemical plants and technologies and to instil the responsibility for applying engineering methods to present a sustainable and environmental friendly approach in the design and services to the society.

Courses:

  • Course one
  • Course two
  • Course three
  • Course four
  • Course five
  • Course six

Applied Chemistry (BSc)

Applied chemistry is the branch of chemistry designed for professional work in the chemical industry. In part, applied chemists conduct research in the field of chemistry in order to discover new information and develop new products.

The Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) degree in Applied Chemistry is comprised of 10 semesters and 148 course credits. The Applied Chemistry major includes course material in all disciplines of chemistry, including organic, inorganic, analytical, physical, and biochemical, as well as covering related fields such as biology, physics and mathematics. In addition to passing all necessary course work, graduates must prepare a research document or final project.

The computer engineering graduate degree program provides students with the tools to accomplish any one or a combination of the three following objectives:

  • Demonstrate the sound technical competency necessary for a professional engineering career
  • Use the necessary modern tools for engineering design and problem solving in real-world situations from a strong technical foundation
  • Understand contemporary issues and the impacts of engineering solutions from a global and societal context
  • Advance to further graduate-level studies

As a result of completing this program, graduates will be able to:

  • Enter the chemical industry
  • Specialize in an area of interest
  • Manage organizational structures and systems
  • Do experimental chemistry
  • Advance to graduate-level studies

Graduates will be able to work in special laboratories, at chemical industries, and in factories. They can also participate in production programs.

Courses

  • Course one
  • Course two
  • Course three
  • Course four
  • Course five
  • Course six